FDA Investigating Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Adelaide Infections Linked to Pre-Cut Melons
Recalls Food Safety Health
U.S. Food & Drug Administration

June 9, 2018

July 26, 2018 Update
As of July 24, 2018, CDC reports that there were 77 cases in nine states with 36 hospitalizations. Illnesses occurred from April 30, 2018, to July 2, 2018. Ill people ranged in age from less than 1 year to 97, with a median age of 67. Sixty-seven percent were female. Out of 70 people with information available, 36 (51%) were hospitalized. No deaths were reported.

Fast Facts

 

  • The FDA, CDC, along with state and local officials are investigating a multi-state outbreak of Salmonella Adelaide infections. CDC reports that fruit salad mixes that include pre-cut melons are a likely source of this outbreak.
  • FDA advises consumers not to eat recalled fresh cut watermelon, honeydew melon, cantaloupe, and fresh-cut fruit medley products containing any of these melons produced at the Caito Foods facility in Indianapolis, Indiana. Caito Foods, LLC distributed products produced at this facility in Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina and Ohio. The products were packaged in clear, plastic clamshell containers and distributed to Costco, Jay C, Kroger, Payless, Owen’s, Sprouts, Trader Joe’s, Walgreens, Walmart, and Whole Foods/Amazon. Caito Foods, LLC has voluntarily recalled fruit salad mixes that contain pre-cut melons to prevent further distribution of potentially contaminated products.
  • The CDC reports that 60 people in five Midwestern states have become ill. Among 47 people with information available, thirty-one cases (66%) have been hospitalized.
  • The 60 illnesses occurred within the period of April 30, 2018 to May 28, 2018.
  • The FDA is working with CDC, along with state partners in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, and Ohio to trace back the pre-cut melons to identify the source to determine the full distribution of pre-cut melons, and to learn more about the potential route of contamination.
  • As this is an ongoing investigation, the FDA will update this page as more information becomes available, such as product information, epidemiological results, and recalls.
  • Consumers who have symptoms of Salmonella infection should contact their health care provider to report their symptoms and receive care. Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps. Most infections usually lasts 4 to 7 days and most people recover without treatment, however some people develop diarrhea so severe that they need to be hospitalized.

What is the Problem and What is Being Done About It?

The FDA, CDC, along with state and local officials are investigating a multi-state outbreak of Salmonella Adelaide infections. Epidemiologic and preliminary traceback evidence indicates that pre-cut melon distributed by Caito Foods, LLC is a likely source of this outbreak. Caito Foods, LLC has voluntarily recalled their products, to prevent further distribution of potentially contaminated products. The recalled products were packaged in clear, plastic clamshell containers and distributed in Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina and Ohio. The FDA is currently working with state partners to trace back the pre-cut melons to identify the source of the pathogen, to determine the full distribution of the pre-cut melons, and to learn more about how the contamination occurred.

There are 60 people ill with this strain of Salmonella in five states: IL (6), IN (11), MI (32), MO (10), OH (1). The ages of the ill people range from less than one year to 97 (median 67 years) and 65% of cases are female. Reported illness onset dates range from 4/30/18 – 5/28/18. Among 47 with available information, 31 (66%) have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

Recalled Products from Caito Foods, LLC

Click here for a full list of recalled products.

What are the Symptoms of Salmonella Infections?

Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most people recover without treatment. Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after infection.

In some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that they need to be hospitalized. In these patients, the Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream and then to other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated promptly with antibiotics.

Who is at Risk?

Children are the most likely to get salmonellosis. The rate of diagnosed infections in children less than five years old is higher than the rate in all other people. Children younger than five, the elderly, and those people with weakened immune systems are more likely to have severe infections. It is estimated that approximately 400 persons in the United States die each year with acute salmonellosis. Children, the elderly, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems should avoid eating raw sprouts of any kind.

What Do Restaurants and Retailers Need To Do?

Retailers should not sell and discard all recalled products listed above that were supplied by Caito Foods, LLC . The products were packaged in clear, plastic clamshell containers and distributed in Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina and Ohio.

Retailers, restaurants, and other food service operators should always practice safe food handling and preparation measures. It is recommended that they wash hands, utensils, and surfaces with hot, soapy water before and after handling food.

  • Wash and sanitize display cases and refrigerators regularly.
  • Wash and sanitize cutting boards, surfaces, and utensils used to prepare, serve, or store food.
  • Wash hands with hot water and soap following the cleaning and sanitation process.
  • Regular frequent cleaning and sanitizing of food contact surfaces and utensils used in food preparation may help to minimize the likelihood of cross-contamination.


What Do Consumers Need To Do?

Consumers should not eat any pre-cut melon or fruit salad mixes containing pre-cut melons that were recalled by Caito Foods, LLC. If already purchased, it is advised throw away the recalled pre-cut melons or return to the place of purchase for a refund. FDA continues to collect information to determine any additional sources. The FDA will update this posting as soon as more information becomes available.

Consumers should always practice safe food handling and preparation measures. It is recommended that they wash hands, utensils, and surfaces with hot, soapy water before and after handling food.

Who Should be Contacted?

People who think they might have symptoms of a Salmonella infection should consult their health care provider.

The FDA encourages consumers with questions about food safety to Submit An Inquiry, or to visit www.fda.gov/fcic for additional information.

We aim to provide information about certain recalls that have the potential to negatively impact your health. For more information on these and other recalls, please refer to fda.gov and fsis.usda.gov.

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